Looking for a Super Food?

The papaya (from Carib via Spanish), papaw, or pawpaw is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya, the sole species in the genus Carica of the plant family Caricaceae.
The flesh (edible part) of the papaya is normally a bright orange color and can have yellow or pink hues. It is deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance.
Papayas, native to Central America, have been long revered by the Latin American Indians. It was first cultivated in Mexico several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classical civilizations. Spanish and Portuguese explorers brought papayas to many other subtropical lands to which they journeyed including India, the Philippines, and parts of Africa.
In the 20th century, papayas were brought to the United States and have been cultivated in Hawaii, the major U.S. producer since the 1920s. This revered tropical fruit was reputably called “the fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus.
Dr. Janardhana Hebbar, a native of India has provided the following
20 AMAZINGLY SWEET AND HEALTHY SECRETS OF PAPAYA
1. Digestive Aid: Papaya is known to be a natural laxative, relieving habitual constipation, bleeding piles and chronic diarrhea. The digestive enzyme papain along with the high water content and soluble fiber improve the ease of digestibility.
2. Fights Emphysema: If you smoke, or are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke, papaya’s vitamin A can help reduce your lung inflammation and stave off respiratory diseases.
3. Prevents Heart Disease: Papaya is rich in fiber, Vitamin C and antioxidants, which prevent cholesterol oxidation that can result in dangerous plague formation contributing to heart attacks or strokes. Papaya contains zero cholesterol, and the high content of fiber will also help lower high cholesterol levels.
4. Intestinal Disorders: The papain in unripe papaya is extremely beneficial for those who are deficient in gastric juice, have excess of unhealthy mucus in the stomach, dyspepsia and intestinal irritation.
5. Menstrual Irregularities: Unripe papaya juice has long been recommended to ease menstrual flow in cases of menstruation cessation in young ladies due to cold or trauma. In pregnant ladies, regular consumption of a small slice of papaya helps to cure nausea and morning sickness.
6. Skin Care: Applying unripe papaya juice on open wounds prevents pus formation and swelling and also is also used to treat skin disorders like chronic ulcers, acne and psoriasis. Papaya face packs help remove pigmentation or brown spots, and improve skin texture and elasticity. Papaya is rich in Vitamin C, Vitamin E and antioxidants like beta-carotene which helps prevent skin cell damage, keeping wrinkles and other signs of ageing at bay.
7. Spleen Enlargement: An ancient remedy to reduce swelling and enlargement of spleen is to consume ripe papaya that has been soaked in vinegar.
8. Respiratory Disorders: A concoction of fresh unripe papaya juice and honey dissolves the “false” air-passage blocking membranes and prevents spread of infection, providing soothing relief against respiratory complaints of cough, bronchitis, breathlessness, over-inflamed tonsils, diphtheria and other throat disorders.
9. Hypertension Antidote: Papaya is also a rich source of Potassium, a critical component in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels, relaxing the nerves and aiding blood circulation, preventing heart ailments and hypertension.
10. Eye Care: Papaya is rich in Vitamin A and phytochemicals – lutein, cryptoxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which help protect and maintain healthy cells, and act as antioxidants and filters blocking harmful high-energy blue wavelengths of light, and preventing diseases like age-related macular degeneration.
11. Anti-Inflammatory: The anti-inflammatory effects of the critical enzymes papain and chymopapain, along with Vitamins C, E, and beta carotene in papaya, greatly reduce inflammation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout and asthma, and increase the rate of healing from burns.
12. Prevents Colon Cancer: The high water content and rich soluble fiber in papaya binds to cancer-causing toxins, and eliminates them from the body during bowel movements and antioxidants, phytonutrients, flavonoids, and carotenes prevent free radical cell damage causing colon, liver, lung and prostate cancers.
13. Strengthens Immunity Shield: The presence of Beta-carotene in papaya is required for the proper functioning of the immune system, preventing recurrent ear infections, cold and flu. Vitamin C, A and E all powerful immune boosting antioxidant vitamins, help maintain healthy mucus membranes, clear skin, good eye sight, all the while fighting free radicals.
14. Aids Weight Loss: Papaya is a great weight loss diet food as it contains very low calories, zero cholesterol, high water content to hydrate, soluble fiber content that satiates you and boosts the waste management functions, effectively helping you shed the pounds from the inside out.
15. Diabetic Food: Papaya is extremely sweet to taste but surprisingly has low-sugar content. A great food for diabetics and people wanting to prevent it.
16. Stress Buster: Vitamin C in papayas help regulate the stress hormones making it a must food before you start your day or when you want to relax after a tiring, stressful work day.
17. Treats Renal Disorders: The aqueous seed extract of the unripe papaya, stimulates antioxidant and oxidative free radical scavenging, in poison induced kidney disorders, speeding the recovery process.
18. Dengue Treatment: The extract obtained from the papaya leaf increases the platelet count or thrombocytes in patients suffering from dengue fever.
19. Fights Human Papillomavirus: Papaya is rich in vital nutrients- beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein zeaxanthin and vitamin C, which reduce the risk of HPV, the cervical cancer virus, affecting women.
20. Nutritional Powerhouse: Papaya contains a special proteolytic enzyme called papain which is an excellent aid to digestion, and treats jellyfish sting and surgical wounds. It is a rich source of anti-oxidant nutrients such as beta-carotene, vitamin A and C and flavonoids, B vitamins B1 and B6, folate and pantothenic acid. It also contains small amounts of the minerals calcium, chlorine, iron, phosphorus, potassium, silicon and sodium important to proper cellular functioning and an essential component of a healthy diet.
Side Effects and Precautions:
• Latex Allergy: Like avocados and bananas, papayas contain substances called chitinases that are associated with the latex-fruit allergy syndrome. There is strong evidence of the cross-reaction between latex and these foods.
• Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don’t take papaya by mouth in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. There is some evidence that unprocessed papain, one of the chemicals found in papaya, might poison the fetus or cause birth defects.
• Carotenemia: Eating too much of a yellow, green or orange-colored food that contains beta carotene can cause a benign form of skin discoloration (yellow or orange) called carotenemia.
• Respiratory Distress: People who eat too much papaya and ingest high levels of papain may develop symptoms consistent with hay fever or asthma, including wheezing, breathing difficulties and nasal congestion.
• Kidney Stones: Consuming more than recommended vitamin C (found in papaya) per day can induce toxicity symptoms, including oxalate kidney stones. Oxalate is a byproduct of vitamin C once the nutrient has been metabolized.
• Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Ironically, the same papain that calms your stomach can cause an upset stomach when taken in large amounts. The high fiber content of papaya can also contribute to unrest of the digestive system when you indulge in too much of the tropical fruit, and the latex in the fruit’s skin may cause stomach irritation.
This perspective on the very popular fruit Papaya is provided by Dr. Janardhana Hebbar, Senior Ayurvedic Consultant at CureJoy.( Knowledge of Life), Mangalore, India. He is author of four books on Ayurveda.

Digging Deep for the Motivation

Many people may have the desire to get fit, but acting on those desires is a completely different story. Oftentimes it involves pressing through mental and emotional challenges that can easily put a halt on your fitness goals, sometimes for years. So how is it that some people are able to find the motivation to work out while others do not? And for those that are struggling to find motivation, how can they get it?
The majority of us are passionate about something. Whether it is about our work, our kids, or our hobbies. Hence, there are just going to be some people that have a passion for fitness and are therefore self-motivated to work out. Still, there are many others who need an extra boost.
During my years as a personal trainer, one of the first things I would do with my clients was determine their whys?  Why did they want to lose weight, why did they want to gain weight, why did they decide that it was finally time to make a financial investment into a personal trainer?  Their reasons varied. To be around longer for their kids, to feel more attractive to their spouse, to gain more energy or to be a smaller size for their upcoming wedding.  Despite their reasons, they all had one thing in common when they came to me for assistance – the motivation to want to make a change. Yet still the challenge would become, how to remain motivated.
Here are the top five things that I found that worked best for my clients which can also be applied to anyone who’s interested in becoming more physically fit.

      (1) Take a Picture of yourself and lay it next to an older picture of you when you were smaller or next to a person’s picture whom you aspire to look like
      (2) Get accountability partners. People that can remind you to stay on track when you are tempted to give up.
      (3) Acknowledge and celebrate small successes. Weight loss takes time. Keep in mind that in order to lose one pound, you must have a caloric deficit of approximately 3,500 calories. Meaning that you will need to burn an extra 500 calories per day just to lose one pound. However, exercise and diet changes will get you quicker results.
      (4) Find a physical activity that you will enjoy. Working out in the gym 6 times a week may not be for everyone. Dancing, bicycling, and rollerblading are great options.
      (5) Pull out a favorite outfit from your closet that you have not been able to wear in years and make it a goal to get in it again.

Unless you are on a reality show Like the Biggest Loser, odds are you are not going to be living with a personal training or with a group of people who are collectively trying to lose weight. However this does not mean that you should neglect your fitness goals, rather, you just have to become more creative in your approach.
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Contributor Renna Reddick is a certified nutrition specialist, personal trainer and group fitness instructor. Certifications include: National Association of Sports Medicine (NASM), National Federation of Personal Trainers (NFPT) and Aerobics, Fitness Association of America (AFAA) Group Fitness Instruction, and NFPT Nutrition Specialist

Reggae’s Cuban Connection

Jamaica never really developed formal diplomatic relations with Cuba until Michael Manley’s government established diplomatic relations in 1972. That year Manley established multi-level relations with Cuba that included trade, bi-lateral technical assistance, loans and other direct aid. Today, there are many Jamaicans studying in Cuba – particularly in health-related professions, while there are many Cuban doctors and other health professionals working in Jamaica. The Jamaican tourist industry is also another employer of several multi-lingual Cubans.
However, probably because of proximity (90 miles), informal (people to people) relationship has existed between the two countries for close to 100 years. Many Jamaicans (including two of my uncles) moved to Cuba and established residence there as earlier as the 1940s. Similarly, Cubans have been moving to establish residence in Jamaica since the early part of the century. As a result, some of the giants of almost any industry in Jamaica have roots in Cuba. Their contributions to Jamaica’s cultural industries are well documented. The six icons referenced in this article represent a small but significant fraction of the bi-lateral, cultural exchange that has taken place between the two countries over the years. These are Cuban-Jamaican giants that have provided significant input in the shaping and development of Reggae music – Jamaica’s gift to the world.
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Alvin “Seeco” Patterson
(born Francisco Willie) was born in Havana, Cuba on December 30, 1930 to a Jamaican father and Panamanian mother. He immigrated to Jamaica as a young child and lived in the parish of Westmorland. Most Jamaicans know him as the talented percussionist who played with Bob Marley, but for Marley, he was big brother, life teacher and music tutor. Patterson and Marley are said to have “grown immensely close and forged a bond that would last until the end of Marley’s life”.
It was Patterson who encouraged Marley as he began to experiment with singing – sharing the experience he had gained playing percussion with famed calypso artist Lord Flea, and with several other Mento/Calypso bands. It is said that Patterson was the one who took the newly formed Wailers group, consisting of Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Livingston and Beverley Kelso to Coxsone Dodd‘s Studio One for their first audition, in July 1964. The resulting recording session, which took place only after Coxsone’s initial rejection of the Wailers, produced the hit single “Simmer Down” – – the record which launched the Wailers’ career.
Over the years Patterson served in the dual role of percussionist and road manager for the Wailers and (later Bob Marley & the Wailers). It is said that he was the “anchor that kept Marley’s music grounded in tradition”, and although not credited, is said to have contributed lyrics to several of Marley’s songs. Patterson was what Jamaicans call a “loyal soldier” who was part of every Marley performance and recording session. He was with him when he collapsed in Central Park and stayed by his side until death. He continued to play with the Wailers Band after Marley’s death until he suffered a near fatal brain aneurism in 1990. Since then he retreated from the music scene – spending his time at home in Kingston and occasionally appearing as guest percussionist at jam sessions.
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Laurel Aitken
was born Lorenzo Aitken in Cuba (of a Jamaican father and Cuban mother) on April 22, 1927. He moved with his family to Jamaica at the age of eleven (1938). Aitken began his career as a nightclub entertainer and was one of Jamaica’s first recording artists in the 1950s. By 1958 he had racked up a number of mento hits including: Baba Kill Me Goat, Swing Low, Nebuchenezer, More Wisky and Low down Dirty Girl. That year Chris Blackwell ventured into the recording business with Boogie in My Bones and Little Sheila with Aitkin for distribution in the United Kingdom.
In 1960 Aitkin moved to Brixton, England and began recording on the Blue Beat label. During that early sixties he traveled between Jamaica and England, recording for producers in both countries – working with the Skatalites in Jamaica and recording for Pama Records – a label established by Palmer brothers, Harry, Jeff and Carl in England. It was during this period that Aitken earned the title Godfather of Ska. In the late 1970s the multi-talented Aitken recorded a few DJ tracks under the name “King Horror”. In the 1980s Aitken move to Leicester, England where he returned to his “roots” as a nightclub performer. That move coincided with the 2-Tone Ska movement in England and Aitken returned to the British chart with a song call Rudi Got Married. He continued to perform until his death at the age of 78 in 2005. He died from complications of a heart attack.
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Rita Marley
was born Alpharita Constantia Anderson in Santiago, Cuba to Jamaican parents Leroy Anderson and Cynthia Jarrett on July 25, 1946. She was brought to Jamaica shortly thereafter – residing in Kingston. In the 1960s she was introduced to Clement Dodd at Studio One and became lead singer of a group called the Soulettes. This group also included her cousin Constance “Dream” Walker and Marlene “Precious” Gifford. It was during this period that she met and married Bob Marley (February 1966). Her group evolved into Rita Marley & the Soulettes and over the years, included singers like Nora Dean, and made hits like Why Should I and Deh Pon Dem.
At the same time, there was another female group at Studio One called the Gaylettes. This group featured Judy Mowatt (lead), Beryl Lawson and Merle Clemenson. They were known for hit records like Silent River Runs Deep, Like Your World and Son of a Preacher Man. In the early 1970s, Judy joined force with Rita and Marcia Griffiths (of Bob Andy & Marcia fame) to form the I-Threes – Jamaica’s premiere female group of the period. They racked up several chart toppers as a group, but were mostly known as the back-up singers for Bob Marley and the Wailers. Rita was injured in the attack on her husband shortly before the 1976 “Smile Jamaica” concert. She continued her solo career after Bob’s death, topping the Jamaican and international charts with One Draw in the 1980s.
In 1986 she founded the Robert Marley Foundation. She is chair of the Bob Marley Trust and the Bob Marley Group of Companies. Since the late 1980s, her life has take a somewhat different turn – towards a life of philanthropy – and giving back. That life includes adoption of children in Ethiopia (35), educational and feeding projects in Africa – particularly Ghana where she presently resides – music education scholarships and multiple projects aimed at alleviating poverty in targeted countries – by way of the Rita Marley Foundation. Her children – Sharon, Cedella, Ziggy and Stephen continue to provide their imprint on reggae music, sports, fashion and other aspects of Jamaican and international life. Two other children – Stephanie and Serita are lending their talents in Rita’s philanthropic efforts.
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Rico Rodriquez
was born Emmanuel Rodriquez on October 17, 1934 in Havana, Cuba. He moved with his family to Jamaica at a very early age and settled in Kingston. He attended Alpha Boys School – a trade and training school founded and run in Kingston run by the Roman Catholic Church in the late 19th century. The school was established in 1880 as a “school for wayward boys”, and became renowned for both the discipline it instilled in its pupils and the outstanding musical education it provided its students. It was here that he met his mentor and teacher – the legendary Jamaican trombonist Don Drummond who was also an older student at the school.
He joined Count Ossie’s band in the late 1950s and played trombone on several recordings during that period. He left Jamaica for England in 1962 where he played with and led several Ska, Rock Steady and Reggae bands – included The Specials, Jools Holland’s Rhythm & Blues Orchestra and his own band – Rico and the Rudies. His recordings included Man from Wareika, A Message to You, Rudy and the album – Roots to the Bone.
Rico was awarded an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) for a life of services to music in July 2007. In October 2012 he was awarded the Silver Musgrave Medal by the Institute of Jamaica in recognition of his contribution to Jamaican music. He still lives in the United Kingdom and performs occasionally at music festivals.
Roland Alfanso was born Ronaldo Alphonso in Havana, Cuba on January 12 1931 from a Cuban father and Jamaican mother. He moved to Jamaica with his mother at the age of two. He began studying the Saxophone at the “Stony Hill Industrial School” at a very early age. In 1948 he left school to join the “Eric Deans” orchestra and later played with several bands on the hotel circuit. Alfanso became a member of Stanley Motta’s session musicians in 1952. Four years later he began recording for Clement “Coxsone” Dodds’s Studio One. In 1958 he joined Bim & Bam’s touring comedy act. The following year he joined one the more popular Jamaican bands at the time – Clue J & His Blues Busters, while simultaneously leading recording session musicians for both Studio One and Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle recordings.
By 1960, Alphonso had become the primary “go to, get it done” session leader for several early sound system operator/producers – including Duke Reid, Prince Lloyd “the Matador” Daley, Clement Dodd and King Edwards “the Giant”. He played virtually all the saxophone instruments – alto sax, tenor sax, baritone sax and flute. During that period he played with several emerging bands including The Alley Cats, the City Slickers, Aubrey Adams Orchestra and the Drew Droppers. In 1962 he left Jamaica for “greener pastures” in the hotel industry in Nassau, Bahamas.
He returned less than a year later to take up the leadership of the newly formed Studio One Orchestra. This band was later rebranded as the Skatallites – a band that has hardly received the credit it truly deserved for building the foundation of Jamaican music. The band included some of the architects of the Jamaican music industry – namely Tommy McCook (died in 1998), Roland Alphonso (died in 1998), Lloyd Brevett (died in 2012), Lloyd Knibbs (died in 2011), Don Drummond (died in 1969), Jah Jerry Haynes (died in 2007), Jackie Mittoo (died in 1990), “Dizzie” Johnny More (died in 2008) and Barbadian singer, Jackie Opel (died in 1970).
The Skatalites recorded their first LP Ska Authentic at Studio One in 1964. They toured Jamaica as the creators of Ska. Among their producers were Coxsone Dodd, Duke Reid, Prince Buster, Vincent “King” Edwards, Justin “Phillip” Yap, Leslie Kong, Lindon Pottinger, Sonia Pottinger and Vincent “Randy” Chin. The Skatalites led sessions with all Jamaica’s top artists of the period – including several young talents that went on to become superstars – such as Delroy Wilson, Desmond Dekker, The Wailers, Toots and the Maytals and Lee “Scratch” Perry. The Skatellites played their last show as a band in Kingston in August 1965. The music they made during the period they were together continued to top the charts in Jamaica and the United Kingdom long after the disbanded. In 1967, their Ska adaptation of the theme from the film – The Guns of Navarone entered the UK top 40 chart.
The band dispersed and evolved into two super-groups – Rolando Alphonso and the Soul Brothers (later rebranded Soul Vendors) and Tommy McCook and the Supersonics. Alphanso suffered a stroke in 1972 at the early age of 41 and decided to migrate to the United States later that year in order to have closer access to medical treatment. However, he returned to Jamaica to record on a regular basis. He kept up this pace throughout the 1980s and 1990s. During this period he also performed live with reggae band – Jah Malla on the reggae music circuit in New York. In 1977, the Jamaican government honored him with the title of Order of Distinction.
In 1983 he rejoined a re-structured Skatallites for several tours and recording sessions until November 2, 1998 when he suffered an aneurism while performing with the band at the Key Club in Hollywood, California. He died at the Cedras-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA eighteen days later.
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Tommy McCook
was born in Havana, Cuba to Jamaican parents on March 3, 1927. He was brought to Jamaica by his parents in 1933. He began playing the tenor saxophone as a student at Alpha Boys School in Kingston. He eventually left school at age 14 to joined the Eric Deans orchestra and later with Roy Coburn orchestra, emerging as a highly skilled jazz player. Between the late ’40s and early ’50s, he also frequently collaborated with Count Ossie, lending his talents alongside those of the Rastafarian hand drummers and chanting vocalists who comprised Ossie’s group.
In 1954, after an overseas engagement with Dean’s Orchestra (in the Bahamas), he decided to stay in south Florida – Miami. It was here that he became exposed to American Jazz legends like John Coltrane and Miles Davis. Upon his return to Jamaica in 1962, he was approached by several producers to record Jazz. This led to his first Jamaican recording session (for Clement “Coxsone” Dodd) titled Jazz Jamaica. Later that year he recorded a Ska version of Ernest Gold’s Exodus. He went on to become a leader of the legendary Skatalites where he was among the most innovative and influential Jamaican musicians of his generation, a prime catalyst behind the evolution and international popularity of ska and reggae music.
After the Skatalites disbanded, McCook founded the Supersonics. This band was soon installed as the house band at Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle studio and became one of the the most sought-after studio unit of the rock-steady era – appearing on classic hits from artists including Alton Ellis, Justin Hinds, and the Techniques.
Tommy McCook remained a fixture of the Jamaican session circuit throughout the years that followed, while simultaneously issuing a number of solo albums for producer Bunny Lee. Among them 1974’s Cookin, 1975’s Brass Rockers, and 1977’s Hot Lava. for producer Glen Brown. In 1976 McCook also issued a blank-labeled LP generally referred to as Horny Dub, and two years later he teamed with trumpeter Bobby Ellis for Blazing Horns.
In 1983 he re-formed the Skatalites nearly two decades after their initial breakup. He relocated them to the U.S. in 1985. A few months later they released their comeback album, Return of the Big Guns. A series of new releases from the Skatalites followed. Their work during this period led to a pair of Grammy nominations. In 1994 they launched their first world tour, which included appearances as part of the Skavoovee U.S.A. tour, a package that included their descendants British Ska band the Specials, the Selecter, and the Toasters. McCook died quietly at his home in Atlanta, GA, on May 5, 1998 at the age of 71.

Giants Behind the Music: Prince Buster

Prince Buster (Cecil Bustamante Campbell) was born in Kingston, Jamaica on May 24, 1938. His work as song-writer and produce during the Ska and Rock-Steady era has made him one of the giant figures of Jamaican music. This work has earned him an Order of Distinction (OD) honor from the Jamaican government. This honor is conferred upon citizens of Jamaica who have rendered outstanding and important service to Jamaica. His body of work as producer is said to have “influenced and shaped the course of Jamaican contemporary music and created a legacy of work that later reggae and ska artists would draw upon”.
Prince Buster, like many Jamaican artist of the time, gained his earliest musical experience from the church. He began performing around Kingston at the “social clubs” as a teenager, and became part of a dance group that performed at the Glass Bucket Club, one of the premier music venues in Kingston at the time. He later joined the crew of “Tom the Great Sabastian”, one of the early sound systems that imported music from the United States – mostly New Orleans. Buster later went on to work with the music legend – Clement “Coxsone” Dodd, the founder of the great Studio One.
His many jobs with Studio One enabled him to learn all the important aspects of both the music and the sound system business. He started his own sound system – named The Voice of the People, and became one of the main rivals of Clement Dodd’s “Sir Coxsone’s Downbeat”. In 1961 Prince Buster started his first record label in the heart of downtown Kingston. That same year he joined forces with drummer Arkland “Drumbago” Parks, guitarist Jah Jerry and Alpha Boys School graduate, Rico Rodriquez (whom he knew from his days at the Baby Grand Club) to release his first record – titled Little Honey backed by an instrumental called Luke Lane Shuffle. That was followed up with recording of the now famous – Oh Carolina by the Folks Brothers. This song is credited with the introduction of Nyabingi Rastafarian drumming and influences in main stream Jamaican music. The song was released on the Blue Beat label in England and went on to become one of the first influential Ska songs released outside Jamaica.
In the 1960s, Prince Buster went on to release several local hits with artists like Alton Ellis on this Wild Bells Label. Among the Ska hits were Wash Wash –which charted in England and Madness which started a kind of Ska revolution around the world. At the end of the late 1960s, after meeting the world heavyweight champion – Muhammad Ali, Prince Buster decided to join the Nation of Islam. He did not walk away from the music business however, and continued to release several rock-steady hits. His song – Al Capone charted at number 18 in the United Kingdom in 1967.Over the years he has had a few cameo roles in movies including The Harder They Come – in which he played a club DJ.
Prince Buster continued to influence Ska revivals in the 1970s and 80s. It is said that the Ska revival of the late 1970s began with the British 2-Tone label’s introduction of his music to a new generation of listeners – some of who were not even born when he was popular in the UK. In 1979 the band Madness released their first single on 2-Tone, a tribute to Buster called “The Prince”. The B-side was a cover of the Prince Buster’s hit song “Madness” from which they took their name. Their second single, released on the Stiff label (“The Prince” was the only single released by Madness on the 2-Tone label), was a cover of Buster’s  “One Step Beyond”, which reached the UK Top 10.
On their self-titled debut album, The Specials covered “Too Hot” and borrowed elements from Campbell’s “Judge Dread” (in the song “Stupid Marriage”) and “Al Capone” (in the song “Gangsters”). The Specials also included a cover of “Enjoy Yourself” on their second album More Specials. The Beat covered “Rough Rider” and “Whine & Grine” on their album I Just Can’t Stop It. Campbell’s song “Hard Man Fe Dead” was covered by the U.S. ska band The Toasters on their 1996 album 2 Tone Army
Prince Buster presently reside in South Florida.

Giants Behind the Music: Vere Johns

Vere Johns (Joseph Vere Everette Johns) was born in Mandeville, a city located in the parish of Manchester in central Jamaica on November 28, 1893 and died on September 10, 1966. He was a journalist/actor and one of the island’s earliest radio personalities. He was producer and host of the Vere Johns talent hour on radio, a program that contributed to the launching of the careers of many of the country’s musical giants. Vare Johns served in the South Lancaster (England) Regiment in World War 1. After the war he moved to the United States where he found work as a newspaper columnist and as host of talent contests.
He returned to Jamaica in 1939 and later joined the Jamaica Star newspaper – where he wrote the weekly column “Vere Johns Says”. Shortly thereafter, he began hosting a weekly talent show on RJR, one of the island’s two radio stations, called “Vere Johns Opportunity Knock”. This show is said to have launched the careers of several artists – among them : Lloyd Charmers, Hortense Ellis, John Holt, Bob Andy, Desmond Dekker, The Wailers, Alton Ellis, Jackie Edwards, Dobby Dobson, Boris Gardiner, Laurel Aitken, and Millie Small. These talent contests were held and recorded live in venues such as The Majestic, Ward, Palace and Ambassador Theaters.
In addition to showcasing talent, these shows also served as scouting venues for producers such as as Clement “Coxsone” Dodd, Prince Buster and Arthur “Duke” Reid – the primary record producers and Sound System operators of the period. Singers were recruited and taken to the Stanly Motta studio (the only recording studio in Jamaica at the time) to record cover versions of US hits for their sound systems.
In addition to his contribution to the music industry, Vare Johns was one Jamaica’s earliest Shakespearean actors and acting teacher.

Caribbean Breadfruit: Not Just Any Fruit

Breadfruit is unlike any other fruit you’ve eaten before. That’s because breadfruit does not have the look, feel or consistency of a typical fruit, but like its name suggests, looks much like bread. When the breadfruit is ripe it is relatively soft and the inside has a yellow, cream colored flesh that resembles bread. The flesh of the breadfruit is somewhat sweet and has a nice fragrant smell.
Breadfruit is native to the Malay Peninsula and the western Pacific islands, but has also been widely grown in tropical regions across the world. Breadfruit is a staple food, sought after for its cheap cost and it being a source of high energy.
In fact, breadfruit was first brought to the Caribbean and the Americas by Captain William Bligh in the late 18th century as a cheap high energy food source to feed and energize slaves in the new world. Breadfruit has the health benefit of providing high energy to those who eat it through its carbohydrates that the body needs for warmth and maintenance during daily activities.
Not only is breadfruit a rich source of energy, breadfruit also contains significantly high amounts of fiber. According to the American Heart Association fiber decreases bad cholesterol and triglycerides which increases heart attack risks. An increased intake of fiber lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol levels in the body, while elevating HDL (good) cholesterol levels in the body. Breadfruit protects the body against heart disease and heart attacks.
Additionally, the fiber found in breadfruit can help those with diabetes to control the disease. Research shows that fiber can control diabetes by reducing the absorption of glucose from the food we eat. Another health benefit of breadfruit is that breadfruit helps to make our intestines and bowels work properly. Fiber regulates bowel movements and clears out the buildup of junk from our intestines; eating breadfruit on a regular basis can reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.
Breadfruit benefits the body as it contains favorable amounts of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. These essential fatty acids help the body and mind to develop normally. Fatty acids also stimulate skin and hair growth, regulate our metabolism, promote reproduction and stimulate bone health. In addition to these health benefits breadfruit also contains Vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, iron and phosphorus. Further research is being done to uncover even more health benefits of breadfruit. But in the meantime, you can start eating more breadfruit and take advantage of the many health benefits we know it has now.