Obesity is a Major Worldwide Challenge: Where does Your Country Rank?

A recent study published at https://renewbariatrics.com/obesity-rank-by-countries/ , estimated that approximately 775 million of the world’s 7.6 billion people – including adult and children are obese. The research suggests there are nearly 650 million obese adults on the planet (as defined as a body mass index (BMI) over 30).

In addition, there are also about 125 million obese children and adolescents in the entire world according to a BMI over 30. The study suggests that the majority of the obesity on the planet resides in a few countries.

Ten Ways to Help Strengthen the Knees and Reduce Knee Pain

  1. Anti-inflammatory Foods

Inflammation can be the cause of pain and weakness of knees. It is very important to include in your diet foods which are anti-inflammatory such as turmeric, walnuts, ginger, spinach, avocados, blueberries, sweet potatoes, tart cherries, olive oil, and salmon. Make sure to avoid inflammatory foods as white rice, white flour products, foods which are high in saturated fats, sugary foods, and soda.

  1. Swimming

Swimming can be very effective in treating knee pain and arthritis because it is an overall fitness. It will reduce the stiffness of the knees, strengthens the bones and the muscles of the knee joints.
You need to swim 30 minutes a day. Butterfly stroke, backstroke, and front crawl are the most effective swimming strokes. Make sure to avoid breaststroke because it applies pressure on the knees joints.

  1. Exercises

Exercises strengthen the knee bones and align the joints. The muscles surrounding the knee will be strengthened, which will improve their condition. Knee bends, step-ups, hamstring stretches with thigh contraction, lunges, straight-leg raises, squats with a Swiss ball, and single-leg squats are some of the most beneficial exercises. It is very important to perform these exercises 30 minutes a day, 4-5 times weekly.

  1. Epsom Salt

Usually, extremely low levels of magnesium are present in people who have weak knees, or people who suffer from knee pain because of osteoporosis or rheumatoid arthritis. Epsom salt is rich in magnesium and it can effectively relieve this condition. It supports the calcium absorption, thus enabling a proper muscle function, and alleviating the inflammation around the knee joints. Dissolve 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt in a half a cup of water. Soak a washcloth in the solution and apply in on your knees. Let it stand for 15-20 minutes. Then, you can rinse it off with warm water.  Repeat this procedure two times a week. Also, once or twice a week, you can make an Epsom salt bath. Add a cup of Epsom salt in your bath, and soak in it for 20 minutes.

  1. Vitamin C

Vitamin C is essential for the collagen formation. It is extremely important for the proper bones development, synthesis of collagen, and quality of bone matrix. Furthermore, it can enhance the bone mass density and reduce the risk of fractures. Vitamin C is found in foods like spinach, berries, lemon, broccoli, papaya, bell peppers, strawberries, Brussels sprouts, oranges, cauliflower, and kiwi. Also, you can take it as supplements such as chewable tablets or capsules.

  1. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is significantly important for joints and bones health. The risk of minimal trauma fractures and bone loss is increased by the deficiency of vitamin D. Also, the body will not be able to absorb enough calcium, if it has a deficiency of this mineral. It is known that exposure to the sun is how our body produces vitamin D. So, spend at least 15 minutes a day in the sun. Vitamin D can be found in fish, fortified cereals, egg yolks, cod liver oil, and dairy products. Also, you can take some supplements recommended by your doctor.

  1. Calcium

Calcium is essential for the health of the bones. The deficiency of calcium can lead to weakening and thinning of bones, which causes osteoporosis. Because calcium is not produced by our body in a natural way, we need to take supplements and dietary sources in order to supply it. Calcium can be found it cheese, milk, dark leafy greens, almonds, edamame, blackstrap molasses, fortified orange juice, sardines, and calcium-fortified cereals. If you want to take supplements, choose those with vitamin D, because it helps the absorption of calcium. Visit your doctor so you can get the proper dose.

  1. Massage

Another effective way to treat knee pain and strengthen the knee area is massage. If it is done on a regular basis, it can improve circulation. Use coconut, mustard, or olive oil to rub your knees with firm but gentle movements (clockwise, and counter-clockwise) for 10-15 minutes. If you feel that there is a need, you can massage your knees two times a day. However, you should consult a massage therapist in case you suffer from a chronic knee pain.

  1. Fish Oil

Fish oil can enhance the bone density and strengthen the knee joints as it contains docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), omega-3 fatty acids. Also, the stiffness and joint pain will be alleviated due to its strong anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. Healthy Weight

The excess body weight can also be a reason for weaken joints. It applies much more pressure on the knees and the joints need to do much more work. The risk of hip or knee replacement is increased by obesity. In order to enhance the strength and stability of the knees, it is very important to lose excess pounds.
 
Source:  NutriLover.com

Looking for a Super Food?

The papaya (from Carib via Spanish), papaw, or pawpaw is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya, the sole species in the genus Carica of the plant family Caricaceae.
The flesh (edible part) of the papaya is normally a bright orange color and can have yellow or pink hues. It is deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance.
Papayas, native to Central America, have been long revered by the Latin American Indians. It was first cultivated in Mexico several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classical civilizations. Spanish and Portuguese explorers brought papayas to many other subtropical lands to which they journeyed including India, the Philippines, and parts of Africa.
In the 20th century, papayas were brought to the United States and have been cultivated in Hawaii, the major U.S. producer since the 1920s. This revered tropical fruit was reputably called “the fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus.
Dr. Janardhana Hebbar, a native of India has provided the following
20 AMAZINGLY SWEET AND HEALTHY SECRETS OF PAPAYA
1. Digestive Aid: Papaya is known to be a natural laxative, relieving habitual constipation, bleeding piles and chronic diarrhea. The digestive enzyme papain along with the high water content and soluble fiber improve the ease of digestibility.
2. Fights Emphysema: If you smoke, or are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke, papaya’s vitamin A can help reduce your lung inflammation and stave off respiratory diseases.
3. Prevents Heart Disease: Papaya is rich in fiber, Vitamin C and antioxidants, which prevent cholesterol oxidation that can result in dangerous plague formation contributing to heart attacks or strokes. Papaya contains zero cholesterol, and the high content of fiber will also help lower high cholesterol levels.
4. Intestinal Disorders: The papain in unripe papaya is extremely beneficial for those who are deficient in gastric juice, have excess of unhealthy mucus in the stomach, dyspepsia and intestinal irritation.
5. Menstrual Irregularities: Unripe papaya juice has long been recommended to ease menstrual flow in cases of menstruation cessation in young ladies due to cold or trauma. In pregnant ladies, regular consumption of a small slice of papaya helps to cure nausea and morning sickness.
6. Skin Care: Applying unripe papaya juice on open wounds prevents pus formation and swelling and also is also used to treat skin disorders like chronic ulcers, acne and psoriasis. Papaya face packs help remove pigmentation or brown spots, and improve skin texture and elasticity. Papaya is rich in Vitamin C, Vitamin E and antioxidants like beta-carotene which helps prevent skin cell damage, keeping wrinkles and other signs of ageing at bay.
7. Spleen Enlargement: An ancient remedy to reduce swelling and enlargement of spleen is to consume ripe papaya that has been soaked in vinegar.
8. Respiratory Disorders: A concoction of fresh unripe papaya juice and honey dissolves the “false” air-passage blocking membranes and prevents spread of infection, providing soothing relief against respiratory complaints of cough, bronchitis, breathlessness, over-inflamed tonsils, diphtheria and other throat disorders.
9. Hypertension Antidote: Papaya is also a rich source of Potassium, a critical component in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels, relaxing the nerves and aiding blood circulation, preventing heart ailments and hypertension.
10. Eye Care: Papaya is rich in Vitamin A and phytochemicals – lutein, cryptoxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which help protect and maintain healthy cells, and act as antioxidants and filters blocking harmful high-energy blue wavelengths of light, and preventing diseases like age-related macular degeneration.
11. Anti-Inflammatory: The anti-inflammatory effects of the critical enzymes papain and chymopapain, along with Vitamins C, E, and beta carotene in papaya, greatly reduce inflammation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout and asthma, and increase the rate of healing from burns.
12. Prevents Colon Cancer: The high water content and rich soluble fiber in papaya binds to cancer-causing toxins, and eliminates them from the body during bowel movements and antioxidants, phytonutrients, flavonoids, and carotenes prevent free radical cell damage causing colon, liver, lung and prostate cancers.
13. Strengthens Immunity Shield: The presence of Beta-carotene in papaya is required for the proper functioning of the immune system, preventing recurrent ear infections, cold and flu. Vitamin C, A and E all powerful immune boosting antioxidant vitamins, help maintain healthy mucus membranes, clear skin, good eye sight, all the while fighting free radicals.
14. Aids Weight Loss: Papaya is a great weight loss diet food as it contains very low calories, zero cholesterol, high water content to hydrate, soluble fiber content that satiates you and boosts the waste management functions, effectively helping you shed the pounds from the inside out.
15. Diabetic Food: Papaya is extremely sweet to taste but surprisingly has low-sugar content. A great food for diabetics and people wanting to prevent it.
16. Stress Buster: Vitamin C in papayas help regulate the stress hormones making it a must food before you start your day or when you want to relax after a tiring, stressful work day.
17. Treats Renal Disorders: The aqueous seed extract of the unripe papaya, stimulates antioxidant and oxidative free radical scavenging, in poison induced kidney disorders, speeding the recovery process.
18. Dengue Treatment: The extract obtained from the papaya leaf increases the platelet count or thrombocytes in patients suffering from dengue fever.
19. Fights Human Papillomavirus: Papaya is rich in vital nutrients- beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein zeaxanthin and vitamin C, which reduce the risk of HPV, the cervical cancer virus, affecting women.
20. Nutritional Powerhouse: Papaya contains a special proteolytic enzyme called papain which is an excellent aid to digestion, and treats jellyfish sting and surgical wounds. It is a rich source of anti-oxidant nutrients such as beta-carotene, vitamin A and C and flavonoids, B vitamins B1 and B6, folate and pantothenic acid. It also contains small amounts of the minerals calcium, chlorine, iron, phosphorus, potassium, silicon and sodium important to proper cellular functioning and an essential component of a healthy diet.
Side Effects and Precautions:
• Latex Allergy: Like avocados and bananas, papayas contain substances called chitinases that are associated with the latex-fruit allergy syndrome. There is strong evidence of the cross-reaction between latex and these foods.
• Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don’t take papaya by mouth in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. There is some evidence that unprocessed papain, one of the chemicals found in papaya, might poison the fetus or cause birth defects.
• Carotenemia: Eating too much of a yellow, green or orange-colored food that contains beta carotene can cause a benign form of skin discoloration (yellow or orange) called carotenemia.
• Respiratory Distress: People who eat too much papaya and ingest high levels of papain may develop symptoms consistent with hay fever or asthma, including wheezing, breathing difficulties and nasal congestion.
• Kidney Stones: Consuming more than recommended vitamin C (found in papaya) per day can induce toxicity symptoms, including oxalate kidney stones. Oxalate is a byproduct of vitamin C once the nutrient has been metabolized.
• Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Ironically, the same papain that calms your stomach can cause an upset stomach when taken in large amounts. The high fiber content of papaya can also contribute to unrest of the digestive system when you indulge in too much of the tropical fruit, and the latex in the fruit’s skin may cause stomach irritation.
This perspective on the very popular fruit Papaya is provided by Dr. Janardhana Hebbar, Senior Ayurvedic Consultant at CureJoy.( Knowledge of Life), Mangalore, India. He is author of four books on Ayurveda.

Caribbean Breadfruit: Not Just Any Fruit

Breadfruit is unlike any other fruit you’ve eaten before. That’s because breadfruit does not have the look, feel or consistency of a typical fruit, but like its name suggests, looks much like bread. When the breadfruit is ripe it is relatively soft and the inside has a yellow, cream colored flesh that resembles bread. The flesh of the breadfruit is somewhat sweet and has a nice fragrant smell.
Breadfruit is native to the Malay Peninsula and the western Pacific islands, but has also been widely grown in tropical regions across the world. Breadfruit is a staple food, sought after for its cheap cost and it being a source of high energy.
In fact, breadfruit was first brought to the Caribbean and the Americas by Captain William Bligh in the late 18th century as a cheap high energy food source to feed and energize slaves in the new world. Breadfruit has the health benefit of providing high energy to those who eat it through its carbohydrates that the body needs for warmth and maintenance during daily activities.
Not only is breadfruit a rich source of energy, breadfruit also contains significantly high amounts of fiber. According to the American Heart Association fiber decreases bad cholesterol and triglycerides which increases heart attack risks. An increased intake of fiber lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol levels in the body, while elevating HDL (good) cholesterol levels in the body. Breadfruit protects the body against heart disease and heart attacks.
Additionally, the fiber found in breadfruit can help those with diabetes to control the disease. Research shows that fiber can control diabetes by reducing the absorption of glucose from the food we eat. Another health benefit of breadfruit is that breadfruit helps to make our intestines and bowels work properly. Fiber regulates bowel movements and clears out the buildup of junk from our intestines; eating breadfruit on a regular basis can reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.
Breadfruit benefits the body as it contains favorable amounts of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. These essential fatty acids help the body and mind to develop normally. Fatty acids also stimulate skin and hair growth, regulate our metabolism, promote reproduction and stimulate bone health. In addition to these health benefits breadfruit also contains Vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, iron and phosphorus. Further research is being done to uncover even more health benefits of breadfruit. But in the meantime, you can start eating more breadfruit and take advantage of the many health benefits we know it has now.